SEG projects in the Space domain have involved deep space search, on-orbit servicing of satellites, platform and sensor allocation, and space based radar applications.

The table provides an overview of projects for which Space is the 'primary' domain. Project names link to the corresponding project write-ups and a brief description of the SEG role.

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Discoverer II

Discoverer II

Program Description: Discoverer II was the predecessor to the Space Based Radar program. Discoverer II was a technology demonstration with the goals of allowing very rapid revisit rates to most areas of the earth, capable of generating very high resolution elevation data, and highly accurate radar imagery. Source: www.fas.org.

SEG Role: SEG provided cost and systems engineering support to the Discoverer II program. Specific efforts included updating the Phase II cost estimate, expanding the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) estimate for the projected Operational System Concept (OSC), and supporting on-site fact-finding sessions at the hardware contractors.

Mars Flyer Probability of Success

MARS

Program Description: NASA Quick Reaction Study to evaluate the costs and risks associated with launching a small UAV to fly a short-duration mission through the atmosphere of Mars. It was being explored as a way to commemorate the Wright Brother’s first flight.

SEG Role: SEG provided cost and systems engineering support to the Discoverer II program. SEG was tasked to be the cost Subject Matter Expert (SME) on this project. Data fact-finding trips to NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA Langley Research Center were conducted. A variety of concepts and associated cost estimates were developed and analyzed and applicable risks were characterized for the Director, NASA.

Orbital Express (OE)

OE

Program Description: Orbital Express was aimed at demonstrating fully autonomous on-orbit satellite servicing capabilities. Goals included: fully autonomous rendezvous out to 7 km with a capability that could support rendezvous at separation distances up to 1,000 km; soft capture and sub-meter range autonomous station-keeping; on-orbit refueling and component replacement as well as other robotic operations. Orbital Express provided the foundation for developing an operational system that could provide routine on-orbit servicing of existing and future space assets.

SEG Role: SEG provided cost, systems engineering, source selection, operations research, and economic analysis support to the OE program. Specific efforts included:

1.
Supported a formal business case analyses in terms of transition opportunities for the OE technologies and operational concepts
2.
Participated in “wargaming” of the OE capabilities for future space missions
3.
Assisted in the Source Selection efforts for initial Phase I awards and subsequent down-select proposal evaluation for the Phase II system design and development contract
4.
Supported key major milestones of Preliminary Design Review, Critical Design Review, and significant agreement modifications necessitated by scope and schedule changes
5.
Assisting the OE Program Manager with evaluation of estimate at completion (EAC) projections to update budget forecasts for remaining tasks leading up to the planned early CY 07 launch date
6.
Provided ground rules and assumptions for OE contractor-generated LCC estimates and analyzed resultant estimates
7.
Drafted Public Affairs materials in support of launch

Sensor-Platform Allocation Analysis Tool (SPAAT)

SPAAT

Program Description: SPAAT is a large-scale, mixed integer program that models the allocation of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) resources to validated collection requirements.  SPAAT was developed to conduct cost-constrained optimization analysis of alternative ISR architectures.  SEG has established model requirements, developed modeling approaches, developed ISR platform and sensor representations, developed scenario inputs, developed/conducted troubleshooting of code, and structured/conducted analyses with the tool.

SEG Role: SEG provided operations research, cost, and systems engineering support to the SPAAT program. SEG established model requirements, developed modeling approaches, developed ISR platform and sensor representations, developed scenario inputs, developed/conducted troubleshooting of code, and structured/conducted analyses with the tool.

Sleight of Hand (SOH)

SOH

Program Description: This program was investigating novel techniques for mitigating the effects of high altitude nuclear detonations (HAND).  It was focused on space qualified sensors and systems that could be brought to bear on the problem.

SEG Role: SEG provided cost and systems engineering support to the SOH program. Specific efforts included evaluating the current status of the program and suggesting cost-effective options for restructuring the program to meet budget and schedule constraints.

Space Based Radar (SBR) Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) AoA

SBR

Program Description: The Space Based Radar (SBR) mission was to provide worldwide, on-demand, near continuous, surveillance, and reconnaissance for battlespace characterization. It was to provide theater and global users (e.g., strategic, Combatant Commanders) with responsive multi-theater capability to detect, geo-locate, identify, and track surface objects regardless of motion, location, or environmental conditions. The SBR program was focused on maturing technology and developing an Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) system capable of providing Ground Moving Target Identification (GMTI), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), and Digital Terrain and Elevation Data (DTED) over a large portion of the Earth on a near-continuous basis. By combining SAR, GMTI, and digital terrain elevation data, Space-Based Radar was to be able to track and target stationary or moving combatants in near real time, almost anywhere on earth, at anytime. Source: www.globalsecurity.org.

SEG Role: SEG provides cost and systems engineering support to the SBR program. SEG developed and created the cost estimate for the entire Battle Management Command, Control, and Communications (BMC3) system. SEG postulated the architecture and then created a corresponding Life Cycle Cost (LCC) estimate.

Space Surveillance Telescope (SST)

SST

Program Description: Current deep space search telescopes are unable to provide a full picture of objects such as microsatellites and space debris that threaten military satellites. Existing search telescopes have narrow fields of view and are incapable of detecting and tracking small objects at the deep space altitudes associated with geosynchronous orbits (roughly 22,000 miles high). Gaps in observational coverage hampers space situational awareness in this critical area of operational space.

The Space Surveillance Telescope program aims to overcome these limitations by enabling ground-based, broad-area search, detection and tracking of small objects in deep space for purposes such as space mission assurance and asteroid detection.  SST should offer improvements in determining the orbits of newly discovered objects and provide rapid observations of transient events and improvements in orbital prediction. Source: www.darpa.mil.

SEG Role: SEG provided cost support to the SST program. SEG assessed size and scope of cost growth at a vendor site and recommended paths forward that would mitigate the impacts.